Hurricane Matthew by the numbers: What we know so far

by Heather Munro on October 12, 2016

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Blue skies may be back, but the impact from Hurricane Matthew is still being felt. As your claims team works around the clock managing your event response, information on the extent of the damage is critical to your ability to respond as quickly as possible.

SpatialKey seamlessly integrates the latest event footprints from third-party data providers like KatRisk, Impact Forecasting, and NOAA so you have access to the up-to-date data you need to take action. You’ll be glad to know that footprints for wind, surge and inland flood for Hurricane Matthew from KatRisk are now integrated within SpatialKey and available for use.

Below, we’ve rounded up the latest statistics on the initial losses from Matthew, so you can continue to evaluate the impact of the storm on your book of business.

Risk modelling firm CoreLogic estimates insured losses from Matthew will likely range between $4 and $6 billion. CoreLogic’s initial figure includes losses from wind and storm surge, but not additional flooding, business interruption or building contents. The firm also places the storm’s losses higher than hurricanes Floyd (1999) and David (1979), but well below hurricanes Katrina (2005) and Sandy (2012).

On top of losses from wind and storm surge, early estimates indicate that the evacuations may result in $10 to $15 billion in losses from economic disruption, according to Chuck Watson, a disaster modeler with Enki Research.

Hurricane Matthew was notable for ending a nine-year streak without an Atlantic Basin Category 5 hurricane. The powerful storm, which weakened as it moved from Haiti to the U.S., forced three million people to evacuate. By the time it was over, it had caused coastal erosion, wind damage, and freshwater flooding across five states, including Florida, Georgia, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Virginia. 

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 In North Carolina, rising flood waters threatened more than 1,500 people in need of rescuing. Photo credit: Associated Press

In the Caribbean, Matthew reached Category 5 status with peak gusts up to 166 mph. Haiti was the hardest hit, with more than 1,000 people killed. Now, a resulting cholera outbreak threatens to cause further devastation in an area with history of earthquakes and hurricanes and a low insurance penetration rate.

At the height of the storm, about 2.2 million people—1 million in Florida alone— lost power.

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 Images from NASA showing power outages during Hurricane Matthew. Photo credit: NASA

Peak wind gusts in the U.S. during Matthew ranged from 69 to 107 mph. At press time, the latest U.S. death toll is 33, but that number could go up as flooding continues over the next few days.

Outside of power loss and severe winds, storm surge was another significant concern. Fernandina Beach, Florida experienced a storm surge of 9.88 feet above normal, and Ft. Pulaski, Georgia encountered record tide levels and a storm surge just under eight feet.

While it’s too early to tally Matthew’s total impact in the U.S., insured losses will undoubtedly increase due to flooding, especially in North Carolina where flooded rivers that wash through farms and coal ash sites may spread toxins through miles of waterways.

The American Red Cross is already spearheading recovery efforts for the many people affected by the powerful event. To support this effort or learn more about how you can help, click here.

In the meantime, as your claims adjusters manage the growing number of claims, remember SpatialKey can help. To find out more or to access the latest Hurricane Matthew data and analyze it against your own portfolio in SpatialKey, contact us today.

Topics: Hurricane, Flood, Insurance, Event response

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